FAQs

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

FAQ 1: Can the MORE Supplemental Type Certificate(s) (STC) be used by Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Part 135 or Part 121 operators?

Answer: The MORE STC(s) may be used by FAR 135 (or FAR 121, FAR 91 or FAR 137) operators. In 1994 FAA Flight Standards (Washington) issued Flight Standards Information Bulletin number FSAW 94-48 to explain to BOTH operators and FAA Principal Maintenance Inspectors, how the MORE STC(s) should be used by FAR 135 operators. While 94-48 is still helpful information, the FAA allowed 94-48 to expire on May 31, 2001. A copy of 94-48 will be provided upon request.

FAQ 2: Is the engine is worn out after the 8,000 hours?

Answer: The engine is NOT worn out after 8,000 hours. Approximately one-half of the engines on the MORE STC have between 4,500 and 7,999 hours on them, AND ARE STILL FLYING. Many engines using the MORE STC have reached 8,000 hours and have gone to an overhaul facility. The condition of these engines were the same or better than if they would have been if the engines had gone to the overhaul facility at the P&WC recommended TBO interval (that is 3,000 to 4,000 hours). The reason for this excellent condition is because the engines were inspected at regular intervals in accordance with the MORE STC(s) and problems were corrected if and when they appeared. This “inspect and correct” technique maintains the engine in good, safe operating condition.

FAQ 3: After reaching 8000 hours on the MORE STC(s), is the overhaul cost higher than if the operator had overhauled the engine at the normal (P&WC recommended) interval (TBO)?

Answer: An engine maintained and operated in accordance with the P&WC recommendations will be in good, safe condition when it reaches the overhaul facility at the P&WC recommended overhaul interval. An engine maintained and operated in accordance with the MORE STC will be in good, safe condition when it reaches the overhaul facility at the 8,000 hour overhaul interval. Both engines will be in a similar condition and will cost a similar amount. HOWEVER, the life-limited disks in the engine on the MORE STC will have accumulated a larger number of cycles (flights). For this reason one or more of these disks may need replacement for expiration of its life limit. However, this is exactly the same situation the operator would have to face when an engine operated in accordance with the P&WC recommendation is inducted for its SECOND overhaul.

FAQ 4: Is it true that Part 91 Operators do not have to comply with the P&WC TBO limitations listed in the P&WC service bulletins (i.e. 1003, 1303, 1403, 1703, 1803, 3003, 3303, 12003, 12103)?

Answer:  FAR 91.409 (f)(3) Requires Overhaul Inspections recommended by the manufacturer for turbo propeller engines. Additionally, FAA Type Certificate (T.C.) Number E4EA approves nearly all P&WC PT6A Engines. (Exception: PT6A-66, 67, 68 are approved under T.C. E26NE).

Note 14 of T.C. E4EA states “Permissible overhaul and inspection intervals are listed in P&WC Engine Service Bulletin Nos., 1003, 1303, 1403, 3003, 4003, 11002, 12002, 12102, 13002, and 13202 as revised.” Because these Service Bulletins are listed in Note 14 of T.C. E4EA, they are part of the Type Certificate and therefore become mandatory for all who operate these engines. The FAA defines Airworthiness’ as “an aircraft or one of its component parts meets its type design or properly altered condition and is in a condition for safe operation, and conforming and maintained according to the Type Certificate”. If a service bulletin required by the Type Certificate is not complied with, the Type Certificate is no longer valid, and the Engine is no longer airworthy.

The only exceptions to this note would be if the operator RECEIVED A WRITTEN EXEMPTION FROM THE FAA FLIGHT STANDARDS DISTRICT OFFICE (FAA FSDO) etc. (or foreign equivalent). The MORE STC is the easiest way to receive such an exemption (but not the only way). An exemption from the FAA FSDO may NOT be transferred when the engine (aircraft) is sold, BUT the MORE STC may be transferred when the engine (aircraft) is sold.

FAQ 5: Is it OK to go past the inspection intervals listed in the MORE STC, if the operator is taking the aircraft in for maintenance?

Answer: It is NOT permissible to go past the P&WC recommended inspection intervals, unless you receive a written exemption from your FAA FSDO. Likewise, it is NOT permissible to go past the MORE STC inspection intervals, unless you receive a written exemption from your FAA FSDO.

FAQ 6: Is it true that only maintenance facilities that are authorized by MORE Company may do the engine maintenance on engines using the MORE STC(s)?

Answer: Any maintenance facility or any person that is approved by the FAA (or foreign equivalent) to perform maintenance on PT6A engines, may perform maintenance on PT6A engines on the MORE STC(s), if that entity is permitted to perform that particular work task. However, MORE Company does reserve the right to use commercial avenues to discourage unscrupulous parties from working on engines using the MORE STC(s).

FAQ 7: To take the engine off of the MORE STC, can I just make a log book entry?

Answer: Since the MORE Instructions For Continued Airworthiness are Supplemental Type Certificate(s) approved by the FAA (and twenty foreign airworthiness regulatory authorities), it is necessary to complete and submit an FAA Form 337 (or foreign equivalent) in order to EITHER put an engine on the MORE STC or to remove an engine from the MORE STC in addition to a log book entry.

FAQ 8: If the operator purchases one of the MORE STC(s) and his engine does not qualify, then is the operator stuck with that MORE STC AND THE EXPENSE OF THAT MORE STC?

Answer: More than ninety eight percent of the engines which were subjected to the MORE STC initial entry inspection were in such a condition that it made better economic sense to repair as necessary (if and when needed) and then to place the PT6A engine on the MORE STC; than to overhaul that engine. MORE Company refund policy: It is our preference to only have satisfied customers. If for any reason you are unsatisfied with our product, you may return it within 30 days of purchase less a $1,000.00 fee once the materials are returned.

FAQ 9: Does the operator have to comply with everything in the MORE STC?

Answer: An operator using P&WC’s maintenance program must comply with everything in P&WC’s maintenance program. An operator using MORE Company’s STC(s) must comply with everything in the MORE Company’s STC. An operator using the operator’s own FAA approved maintenance program must comply with everything in the operator’s own FAA approved maintenance program. The FAA (or foreign equivalent) is very strict about this.

FAQ 10: Once the MORE STC is purchased, does MORE Company no longer care about the engine or the operator?

Answer: MORE Company does care about the operator and the engine(s) after the engine has been placed on the MORE STC. Since the fall of 1993, MORE Company has spent tens of thousands of hours providing technical and administrative support to our customers. MORE Company has provided help with nearly every request. MORE Company has worked diligently to refine and improve the MORE STC(s). MORE Company works with Aviation Laboratories to make sure operators are informed promptly, if the results of an oil sample or oil filter debris sample are abnormal.

FAQ 11: Does the operator have to put both engines on the MORE STC at the same time?

Answer: It is NOT NECESSARY to place both engines on the MORE STC at the same time, BUT IT IS A VERY PRUDENT THING TO DO. It requires care and diligence to maintain any turbine aircraft engine and its’ records properly. It doubles the work load and it doubles the opportunities for mistakes; if one engine is on one maintenance program (schedule) and the other engine is on a different maintenance program (schedule). MORE Company is aware of several operators, who had one engine on the MORE STC and the other engine on another program (schedule), who made mistakes with respect to engine maintenance or engine maintenance records and who subsequently got in trouble with the FAA.

FAQ 12: Should the operator wait until his engine nears the overhaul interval expiration before he places his engine on the MORE STC?

Answer: FIRST, the MORE STC is intended to be an enhanced form of engine maintenance that allows the operator to become aware of problems in their early stages and to correct them promptly, thereby improving reliability, durability and safety. SECOND, the MORE STC is intended to provide an extension to the engine time between overhauls. IF the operator is interested in obtaining a TBO extension and IF the operator is interested in IMPROVING reliability, durability and safety; then the operator should NOT wait until the engine approaches TBO expiration before placing the engine(s) on the MORE STC.

FAQ 13: Is the overhaul interval provided by the MORE STC(s) transferable to another owner if the sale of the aircraft occurs?

Answer: The MORE Instructions For Continued Airworthiness are FAA approved Supplemental Type Certificate(s) and the increase in TBO is transferable with the engine (aircraft) to a new owner, exactly the same way that any other STC placed on either the engine or aircraft is transferable with the engine (aircraft) when the engine (aircraft) is sold.

FAQ 14: If the operator’s engine has gone past the P&WC recommended overhaul interval, can the engine still be placed on the MORE STC?

Answer: As long as the engine has accumulated less than 8,000 hours since the previous overhaul and as long as the engine can be repaired (if necessary) to make it eligible to pass the MORE STC initial entry inspection requirements, without exceeding economically prudent limits; the engine may be placed on the MORE STC.

FAQ 15: Does a FAR, Part 91 operator still have to comply with P&WC Service Bulletins even if they are listed on the MORE STC?

Answer: An FAA Part 91 (or Part 135 or Part 137) operator must comply with ALL P&WC Service Bulletins that are listed in the MORE STC, as well as with all the other requirements that are specified in the MORE STC, UNLESS HE HAS RECEIVED A WRITTEN EXEMPTION FROM HIS FAA FSDO. Likewise, an FAA Part 91 (or Part 135 or Part 137) operator using the P&WC maintenance manual (program) must comply with all the requirements that are specified in the P&WC maintenance manual (program), UNLESS HE HAS RECEIVED A WRITTEN EXEMPTION FROM HIS FAA FSDO.

FAQ 16: Does the MORE STC(s) require more detailed engine records be maintained?

Answer: The record keeping requirements of the MORE STC(s) are in compliance with what the FAA FSDO(s) expect operators to keep. If it seems as if the MORE STC(s) require more detailed engine records than the operator is now keeping, it is likely that the operators records are not up to the FAA’s desired standard. Whether the engine is on the MORE STC or not, better, more detailed engine records will significantly enhance the value of the engines and the airplane they are installed on. Anyone who has spent sufficient time in the aviation industry has seen aircraft that can not be sold except for scrap, because the records are so poor or incomplete.